Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd World Bioenergy Congress and Expo Rome, Italy.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Weilan Shao

Jiangsu University School of the Enviroment, China

Keynote: How does Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus regulate its ethanol fermentation pathway?

Time : 09:30-10:00

OMICS International Bioenergy 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Weilan Shao photo
Biography:

Weilan Shao obtained PhD dgree in 1993 from the University of Georgia and had postdoctoral studies in the University of Wisconsin. She has been a professor in China since 2000. She has published more than 100 papers and has been serving as an editorial board member of Chines Journal of Biotechnology.

Abstract:

Thermoanaerobacter species can efficiently use lignocellulose derived substrates to grow at temperatures above 70°C. T. ethanolicus produces ethanol as main fermentation product. The final steps of the ethanol fermentation pathway are redox reactions from acetyl-CoA to ethanol via an acetaldehyde intermediate. AdhA, AdhB and AdhE encoded by genes adhA, adhB and adhE are the key aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases to catalyze these reactions. rnAafter identifying adhE in T.ethanolicus, we find that the ethanol titer of fermentation is controlled by both transcriptional regulation and the properties of AdhA, AdhB and AdhE. The transcription of dehydrogenase genes is regulated by redox sensing protein, which binds to oprators of different affinities so that adhA, adhB and adhE are expressed at directed time. Real time PCR results show that cells transcribe adhB in the absence of ethanol while the transcription of adhA and adhE needs be induced by a low concentration of ethanol. Further increased ethanol concentrations inhibit the transcription of all these genes. Under imitating physiological conditions, the enzyme AdhE and AdhB play crucial roles of aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenases, respectively, in ethanol formation. However, the propertied and physiological roles of AdhA were not determined until the enzyme is successfully expressed and purified recently. The main physiological function of AdhA is to control ethanol titer by sensing and consuming ethanol in growing cells. After T. ethanolicus JW200 was transformed by adhA or/and adhE expression plasmids, the homologous expression of adhE enhenced the ethanol production, while that of adhA reduced the ethanol fermentation levels.rnThese results supports a regulation theory: The limitation of ethanol concentration during fermentation is caused by a systematic regulation through transcriptions and activities of the key enzymes in the ethanol-formation pathway.

Keynote Forum

Animesh Dutta

University of Guelph, Canada

Keynote: Hybrid thermochemical and biochemical conversion of biomass for renewable fuels and products

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Bioenergy 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Animesh Dutta photo
Biography:

Animesh Dutta is an Associate Professor and Director of Bio-renewable Innovation Lab, and Associate Director, Graduate studies with the School of Engineering at the University of Guelph. Dr Dutta is specialized in advanced energy systems and thermo-fluid science with hands-on experience in reactor design and pilot plant operation, design and performance of various tests in laboratory scale and pilot scale units, thermal design and process development. In his career, he has published over 70 peer-reviewed journal papers, 2 book chapters, and has roughly 85 conference publications and reports.

Abstract:

Food security, climate change, and energy sustainability are three major challenges in the 21st century. Among different renewable energy sources, bioenergy is a renewable primary energy source that touches all three major issues due to its competition with food on land use, low net CO2 emissions, and potentially sustainable if the economical, environmental and societal impacts are properly managed. The research at Bio-reneable innovation lab (BRIL) at Guelph focuses on research and development of a novel approach for the production of an array of renewable products such as energy, fuels, and products from Canada’s particular range of low grade biomass sources. These sources range from woody biomass to agricultural wastes, municipal green bin collections, and animal manures. This novel approach integrates thermochemical and biochemical conversion processes through a series of innovative technologies (i.e. hydrothermal pretreatment, supercritical gasification or anaerobic digestion with dry reforming, gas-to-liquid fuel through fermentation). The innovative and synergistic integration of design with processing through the above projects are expected to result in renewable fuels and value-added products. The resulting biocarbon can substitute fossil resources on a cost-performance basis with the added benefit of eco-friendliness. This could mean a tremendous reduction in greenhouse gas emission through the use of bioproduct, reducing our dependency on petroleum.The use of hydrothermal, chemical looping and supercritical gasifications, anaerobic digestion, dry reforming of biogas to produce syngas, and syngas fermentation techniques in the development and application of biofuels and products would lead to reduced dependency on petroleum and a sustainable economy.

OMICS International Bioenergy 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Juan Matos Lale photo
Biography:

Juan Matos Lale completed his PhD in Physics and Chemistry of Surface at the Central School of Lyon (France) in 1999. He worked upon the influence of carbon materials in different heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions with potential applications in solar nanotechnology. He focuses his research in the synthesis, characterization and applications of nanomaterials in catalysis, photocatalysis, environmental, industrial and green chemistry and alternative energies processes. He has been Invited Professor at Clark University (USA) in 2004, Claude Bernard University (France) in 2005, Palermo University (Italy) in 2007, Szceczin University (Poland) in 2008, Max Plank Institute for Colloids and Interfaces (Germany) in 2010, Politechnique University of Valencia (Spain) in 2010-2011, Adam Mickiewizs University (Poland) in 2011, and National Carbon Institute at Oviedo, Spain (2012). He is now Full Professor and Researcher of the Biomaterials Department in the Technological Development Unit (UDT) of University of Concepcion. He currently has about 70 papers published in high impact journals, about 1500 citations and h-factor 18.

Abstract:

rnBiochar-based materials applications in catalytic and photocatalytic reactions related with the photoproduction of liquid and gaseous molecules will be presented. Sawdust of a soft wood was used to prepare biochars for H2 photoproduction on Au-TiO2/biochars under visible irradiation. A remarkable increase in the photoactivity of the composite up to a factor about 3 times higher than the commercial catalyst free of biochars was found and ascribed to the surface pH of biochars. Biomass-derived molecules such as furfural, chitosane, and saccharose were used to prepare hybrid C-TiO2 materials by solvothermal synthesis. Hybrid TiO2-C supports led to an important enhancement in the catalytic activity of Pd-based catalysts in the electrooxidation of formic acid with a maxima density power up to 3.3 times higher than the same catalyst on a commercial carbon. Pd-based catalysts supported on hybrid Biochar-TiO2 supports can be designed to control the selectivity of phenol hydrogenation to cyclohexanone or cyclohexanol (up to 100% yield) by controlling the chemical nature of the biochar supports. Up to 10 times higher photoactivity that the standard semiconductor was found in the photodegradation of methylene blue under visible-irradiated Biochar-based/TiO2 materials. An integrated approach will be presented to remark the potential of biochar-based sustainable catalysis and photocatalysis considering energy production and environmental considerations. It can be concluded that biochars-based materials show new perspectives for the sustainable catalysis and photocatalysis related with clean energy production, green and selective catalytic processes, and for the environmental remediation of polluted water by solar technology.rn

Break: Coffee Break @ Foyer 11:00-11:15
  • Track 3: Bioenergy Conversion

Session Introduction

Foster Agblevor

Utah State University, Logan UT, USA

Title: Production of infra-structure ready biofules from olive mill wastewater sludge

Time : 11:15-11:35

Speaker
Biography:

Foster Agblevor is currently the Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) endowed Professor of Biological Engineering at Utah State University (USU), Logan UT and Director of USTAR Bioenergy Center, Utah State University. He is also Adjunct Professor of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA. He received Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry from the University of Toronto. He did postdoctoral work at the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute,University of Hawaii, Manoa Campus, Honolulu, HI.

Abstract:

Olive oil production is a major industry in the Mediterranean countries such as Tunisia, Spain, Italy, Greece, and Turkey. Together, these countries produce about 90% of the world olive oil. Olive oil production generates olive mill waste water which contains phenolics, sugars and other substances that have to be disposed. The current disposal system in Tunisia for example consists of solar evaporation of the water and land filling of the solid sludge. We investigated the catalytic pyrolysis of the olive mill wastewater sludge (OMWS) in a fluidized bed system using HZSM-5 and other catalysts and compared them with pyrolysis using sand as the pyrolysis medium. The pyrolysis with sand generated very viscous liquids which were almost paste-like at room temperature, but when either the HZSM-5 or other catalysts were used as the fluidized bed catalytic pyrolysis medium, very low viscosity liquids (6 cP @40 C) were produced and the higher heating value (HHV) was as high as 42 MJ/kg and the oxygen content of the oil was less than 5 wt%. The oil formed two phases with the aqueous fraction and the pH was neutral. The gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis and 13C NMR analysis of the oils showed that whereas the pyrolysis of OMWS on sand produced a large number of long chain fatty acid products, the catalytic pyrolysis oils consisted of mostly ketones, esters, and alcohols with very little fatty acid groups. The properties of the catalytic pyrolysis oils showed that it could qualify as a green diesel fuel or it could be readily hydrogenated to improve its properties further as an infrastructure ready biofuel for either transportation or heating fuel. This technology provides a potential solution for waste disposal in olive oil industry while simultaneously generating fuel and can also serve as vehicle for greenhouse gas reduction.

Speaker
Biography:

Simmons joined Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, CA) in 2001 as a Senior Member of the Technical Staff after receiving his Ph.D. from Tulane University. In 2007, he was one of the principal co-investigators of the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI, www.jbei.org), a ten year, $259M DOE funded project tasked with the development and realization of next-generation biofuels produced from non-food crops. He is currently serving as the Chief Science and Technology Officer and the Vice-President of the Deconstruction Division at JBEI, where he leads a team of 41 researchers working on advanced methods of liberating fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. He is also the Senior Manager of the Advanced Biomanufacturing Group at Sandia and serves as the Laboratory Relationship Manager for the Biomass Program. He has over 250 publications, book chapters, and patents. His work has been featured in the New York Times, BBC, the Wall Street Journal, the San Francisco Chronicle, Fast Company, and the KQED televised science program Quest.

Abstract:

Ionic liquids (ILs), solvents composed entirely of paired ions, have been used in a wide variety of process chemistry and renewable energy applications. Imidazolium-based ILs show remarkable abilities to dissolve biomass, and are thus an ideal media for biomass pretreatment and depolymerization[1]. Although very efficient, imidazolium cations are currently expensive and therefore their large scale use and industrial deployment, e.g. in biorefineries, is limited[2]. In an attempt to replace imidazolium-based ILs with ILs derived from renewable sources that retain their efficiency for biomass pretreatment, we synthesized a series of tertiary amine based ILs from aromatic aldehydes derived from lignin and hemicellulose, the major byproducts of lignocellulosic biofuel production. A comprehensive analysis of extractable cell wall carbohydrates and sugar yields from switchgrass and switchgrass pretreated with tertiary amine based ILs derived from vanillin ([Van][H2PO4]), p-anisaldehyde ([p-AnisEt2NH][H2PO4]) and furfural ([FurEt2NH][H2PO4]) confirmed their effectiveness for biomass pretreatment. The amounts of sugar released by enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose present in switchgrass was comparable to that obtained after pretreatment with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2C1Im][OAc]). Enzymatic saccharification with [FurEt2NH][H2PO4] and [p-AnisEt2NH][H2PO4] provided 90% and 96% of total possible glucose and 70% and 76% of total possible xylose, respectively, after biomass pretreatment[3]. Our concept of deriving ILs from lignocellulosic biomass shows significant potential for the realization of a “closed-loop” process for future lignocellulosic biorefineries, and has far-reaching economic impacts for other IL based process technology currently using ILs synthesized from non-renewable sources.

Marc Pomeory

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA

Title: Method for hot real-time sampling of Gasificaton Products

Time : 11:55-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Marc Pomeroy completed his Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from Colroado State University in 1992. He has since worked as an analytical chemist and technician for the US Antarctic Program as well as in the pharameutical and scientific instrument industries. He is currently an analytical chemist supporting the Thermochemical Process Development Unit for Pilot Scale Biomass Conversions at the US Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Abstract:

The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a highly instrumented half-ton/day pilot scale plant capable of demonstrating industrially relevant thermochemical technologies from lignocellulosic biomass, including gasification. Biomass derived gasification products are a very complex mixture of chemical components that typically contain Sulfur and Nitrogen species that can act as catalysis poisons for tar reforming or synthesis catalysts. Real-time hot online sampling techniques, such as Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS), and Gas Chromatographs with Sulfur and Nitrogen specific detectors can provide real-time analysis providing operational indicators for performance. Sampling trypically requires coated sampling lines to minimize trace sulfur interactions with steel surfaces. Sample line Residence time within the sampling lines must be kept to a minimum to reduce further reaction chemistries. Solids from ash and char contribute to plugging and must be filtered at temperature. Experience at NREL has shown several key factors to consider when designing and installing an analytical sampling system for biomass gasification products. They include minimizing sampling distance, effective filtering as close to source as possible, proper line sizing, proper line materials or coatings even heating of all components, minimizing pressure drops, and additional filtering or traps after pressure drops.

Speaker
Biography:

Tatsuo Omata has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from University of Tokyo. He is the professor of Nagoya University. He has been working on CO2 and nitrate assimilation of cyanobacteria and published more than 80 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Photosynthetic microorganisms are thought to be good materials for biofuel production, but the productivity of algae-based biofuel production is too low to be sustainable. The intrinsic problem is the low product yields on a per-cell basis; Although green algae can accumulate TAG to a level as high as ~50% of cell dry mass (i.e., product-to-cell ratio = 1), simple calculations revealed that a much higher product-to-cell ratio (> 4) is required for environmentally sustainable production. To achieve this, the strategy of “milking” cells needs to be adopted. It requires: 1) high rate of production of a fuel-related compound; 2) limitation of cell growth without inhibiting photosynthesis; and 3) rapid excretion of the product into the medium. None of these is, however, compatible with the nature of photosynthetic microorganisms. Our goal is to achieve milking of cyanobacterial cells for production of free fatty acids (FFAs), using genetically engineered Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. We chose this strain because it was found to have an unusually high capacity of FFA synthesis, fulfilling the requirement 1) shown above. The cells are, however, severely suffering from over-accumulation of FFA in the cell. We are growing the cells under nitrate-limited conditions to fulfill the requirement 2), and trying to enhance active and passive FFA transport across the cell envelope to fulfill the requirement 3). The latest results of our effeorts will be presented and evaluated in relation to the target values set for the product-to-cell ratio and the rate of production.

Pinakeswar Mahanta

Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati, India

Title: Co-gasification of biomass and coal in fluidized bed gasifier

Time : 12:35-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Pinakeswar Mahanta is a professor in the department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Guwahati. His major area of research is on thermodynamics, heat transfer and renewable energy. He has established an international platform for research in the area of bio-energy with University of Nottingham, University of Birmingham, and Loughborough University, UK. Similarly, he has established collaboration in the field of clean coal technology with University of Cranfield, UK and UCL, Belguim. He has published more than 60 papers in internationally reputed peer reviewed journals and supervised 9 PhDs. Currently, he holds the position of the Dean of faculty Affairs at IIT Guwahati.

Abstract:

Coal is the main commercial energy fuel in India, amounting to 61% of installed electrical capacity as of 31st march, 2016. However, apart from the issue of being a fossil fuel with limited resource, Indian coal is of low quality, high ash content and low calorific value and so, it cannot be utilized efficiently. Another major concern associated with the usage of coal is the emissions. Recent research has proven that adoption of co-gasification technology (using mixed feed of biomass and coal) for power generation will help overcome these challenges. Co-gasification in fluidized bed gasifier provides excellent mixing and gas solid interaction that enhance the chemical reaction rate and conversion efficiency. The most attractive benefit of co-gasification is the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, environmental pollution and effective utilization of low grade coal. At IIT Guwahati three types of locally and abundantly available agricultural waste biomasses viz; saw dust, rice husk and bamboo dust, have been selected for co-gasification in circulating fluidized bed gasifier. It has been observed that the biomass characterization and percentage of biomass blends with coal is very important as it is directly related to the fuel gas composition. Co-gasification process not only produces a low carbon footprint on the environment, but also improves the H2/CO ratio in the produced syngas, which is required for liquid fuel synthesis. The inorganic matter present in biomass catalyzes the gasification of coal. Additionally, recent research investigations reported superior gas quality by using coal-biomass blends at different operating condition of temperatures.

Speaker
Biography:

Rajiv Chandra Rajak, currently pursuing PhD under the guidance of Prof. Rintu Banerjee from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India. Mr. Rajak is working in the area of Biomass Deconstruction using biological catalsyt and its role in reducing sugar production. As an outcome of his research activities, he has published 3 research articles in peer reviewed international journals and a patent on biomass delignification. He was also awarded with the best poster award at Asian Congress In Biotechnology-2013, New Delhi, India.

Abstract:

There is a growing interest worldwide in utilization of bioresources through biobased processes leading to channeling considerable effort towards development of new and efficient technologies. Enzymes produced from microorganism’s acts as a green route for lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment. Saacharum spontaneum or Kans grass is a potential lignocellulosic rich in cellulose (38.70 %), hemicelluloses (29.00 %), and lignin (17.46 %). To utilize the major proportion of the carbohydrates such as cellulose and hemicelluloses to produce reducing sugar, degradation of lignin is an important prerequisite in bioethanol production process. In the present work, an enzymatic pretreatment process for lignin degradation or delignification has been optimized through response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD). The maximum delignification recorded was 81.67 % at 6 h upon monitoring the lignin content of 17.46 %. The effectiveness of the enzymatic pretreatment process was investigated through various microscopic and spectroscopic tools as well through porosity analysis that evidenced the specific action of enzyme on lignin. Moreover, the efficacy of enzymatic pretreatment process on enzymatic hydrolysis was studied through optimization based on central composite design. The maximum reducing sugar obtained was 500.30 mg/g at 5.30 h of incubation time which indeed supports the potential of enzymatic mode of biomass pretreatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Anjani Devi.Chintagunta is pursuing her PhD under the guidance of Prof. Rintu Banerjee from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur. She completed her Master's from JNTU, Kakinada. She have published two papers in peer reviewed national/international journals, two patents (filed) and attended two International conferences. She has achieved best paper presentation award in National symposium on Innovative and Modern Technologies for Agricultural Productivity, Food Security and Environmental Management held at Manglore, Karnataka in 2011.

Abstract:

Indiscriminate disposal of the solid waste generated from various agricultural practices and agro based industries causes detrimental effects in the environment. Utilisation of the waste biomass for the production of value added products through biotechnological intervention not only helps to combat environmental pollution but also adds to the economy. Hence, the present work focuses on integrated production of bioethanol and biomanure from pineapple leaf waste for its complete utilisation leading to zero waste generation. Bioethanol production from pineapple leaf waste was carried out through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) by employing cellulolytic enzyme from Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The SSF of pineapple leaf waste resulted in bioethanol production of 7.01% (v/v). The residue obtained after bioethanol production was inoculated with five different strains of blue-green algae and their concoction for nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) enrichment. Among them, Fischerella muscicola was found to enrich N, P and K content of the residue by nearly 6.84, 8.78 and 14.17 fold than that of the initial content, ultimately leading to improved NPK ratio of approximately 3.5:1:2. The efficient conversion of pineapple leaf waste to bioethanol and enrichment of residue obtained after SSF for its application as biomanure envisages environmental sustainability.

Break: Lunch Break @ Restaurant 13:25-14:10
  • Track 6: Bioenergy Economy, Market, Policy and Social Acceptance
    Track 9: Bioenergy Applications
    Track 12: Biogas
    Trcak 13: Biodiesel

Session Introduction

Sandra D Eksioglu

Clemson University, USA

Title: Bioenergy supply chains optimization: models and applications

Time : 14:10-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Sandra D. Eksioglu is an Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering at Clemson University. Her research focus has been on the theory and application of operations research tools to problems that arise in the areas of transportation, logistics, and supply chain. She works on developing mathematical models and solution algorithms that help design and manage large scale and complex supply-chains. In particular, she is interested in the application of these tools to the bioenergy supply chain. She received the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation in 2011 for her work on biofuels supply chain. She has co-authored over 70 refereed publications.

Abstract:

In the recent years we have seen an increasing interest in many areas of research related to bioenergy. This interest has been motivated by the potential that exist to make bioenergy a future power sources in the USA and world. Despite the increasing interest, the economic viability of bioenergy and its future has been challenged for a number of reasons. For example, all the types of bioenergy will continue to face biomass feedstock transportation and other logistics challenges which have imposed limitations on the production capacities of biofuel plants. This presentation summarizes mathematical models which support large-scale biomass transportation and consequently large-scale production of bioenergy. These models are extensions of the multi-facility supply chain design problem. One of the extensions that will be discussed in this talk is a two-stage stochastic programming model which is used to capture uncertainties of biomass supply and biomass conversion. On-going concerns about bioenergy are focused not only on its economic viability, but also, on its carbon footprint. This is because the steps involved in production and transportation of biomass are energy intensive. Thus, some of the models which will be presented do focus on minimizing costs and carbon footprint due to transportation activities in the supply chain. These models are tested via a number of case studies developed using data from the Southeast region of USA. Numerical results will be presented.

Sergio Luis Rivero Acha

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Italy

Title: Integrated bioenergy and food systems: Building sustainable options based on evidence

Time : 14:30-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Sergio Rivero has completed his MSc. In Energy and Environmental Management from the University of Twente in the Netherlands. He currently holds a position as technical consultant at the Bioenergy and Food Security (BEFS) project from the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Previous work experience includes working on renewable energy related projects with institutions such as GIZ (EnDev project) and The Nature Conservancy.

Abstract:

Energy playing an essential role in society is central to development and enables modern life. At present, the energy sector heavily relies on fossil fuel supply and is the source of two-thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions. Consequently, energy policy decisions in countries will play an important role in the future. As part of an alternative energy mix, bioenergy could play a role in countries complementing current energy production in order to reduce fossil fuel dependence and increase energy sovereignty. Bioenergy and Food Security (BEFS) approach developed by FAO allows a multidisciplinary assessment of bioenergy production considering food security aspects, natural resources availability and techno-economic feasibility. By applying this approach in a country, it is possible to recognize opportunities for bioenergy production using biomass available that have been identified as available not affecting the national food security. Moreover, BEFS is able to analyze the techno-economic feasibility of different bioenergy technologies under the specific context of the country. Thus, it is possible to detect key elements such as specific profitable production conditions in the country, minimum profitable plant sizes, and price ceiling for feedstock. In this work, examples of how BEFS approach has been applied in Turkey and Egypt are presented. These examples illustrate the overall BEFS process and show how bioenergy can be used as alternative to take advantage of biomass residues to mitigate environmental impacts, as profitable option to meet national energy targets or as alternatives to promote rural development.

Speaker
Biography:

Kumaran Palanisamy, a graduate mechanical engineer from Purdue University is a Senior Lecturer at Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN). He pursued his PhD studies at UNITEN, aimed at developing biodiesel fuel derived from waste cooking oil for power generation gas turbine application. He has 10 years working experience in electric power generation in a multinational electricity utility corporation in Malaysia, Tenaga Nasional Berhad. Recently, he has been appointed as Principle Researcher at Center for Renewable Energy at UNITEN and actively pursuing research on harnessing biogas energy potential from waste in particular, sewage and palm oil mill sludge.

Abstract:

Malaysia has been experiencing rapid growth in population, industrialization and urbanization. Currently, the population is about 30.1 million and more than 70% of this was reported to be living in the urban areas. This rapid development has resulted in generation of greater amount of wastes. With the current population growth, it is approximated that the load of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated by the year 2020 will be 49,000 tons/day or more than 12 million tons/year whereby almost 29.0% are food and organic wastes. More than 90.0% of the solid wastes are disposed at landfills, which most of them are saturated and overloaded, but, due to the scarcity of land and public complaints, making building of new landfill almost impossible, hence the disposal of MSW is a big problem and is one of the major environmental issues faced by country. Meanwhile, in the sewerage industry, sludge that is high in embedded energy is generated and it can be used to produce methane through anaerobic digestion especially in the modern mechanized sewage treatment plant (STP). However, the secondary thickened sludge (STS) is a poor substrate for anaerobic digestion. Hence, co-digestion is an environment and ecological friendly way to dispose the food wastes and to overcome low biodegradability of STS. Besides that, it can be used to produce renewable energy which could reduce the dependency of fossil fuel for power generation in the country. Moreover, it also can deliver beneficial synergies for the sewage industry and the MSW industry. This work elucidates the preliminary investigation of the potentials of co-digestion of STS and food waste and its effect on biodegradability and methane yield, which proposes a sustainable management of solid waste generated in urban areas while harnessing the resources to generate green electricity.

Speaker
Biography:

C. Prem Ananth Surendran, a part time Ph.D Scholar in the Bio-energy Research group of Environmental Technology Department in Central Leather Research Institute (CSIR), Adyar, Chennai, working as a full time Deputy Planner in the Chennai Metropolitan Development Authority (CMDA) Government of Tamil Nadu. He has completed his Master’s in Engineering (M E) degree in Urban Engineering, from Department of Civil Engineering, Anna University, Chennai.. He has played a key role in developing and planning smart and green cities in Govt. of Tamil Nadu.

Abstract:

The present case study demonstrated the performance of large scale biogas plant for wholesale vegetable complex waste (30 tonnes per day) using biogas induced mixing arrangement (BIMA) digester for biogas and power generation. The BIMA digester located in Koyambedu, Chennai (India) is one of the unique facility in India producing biogas and power using wholesale vegetable complex waste, operated successfully for the past eight years. The vegetable complex waste contains predominantly banana stem, cauli flower, cabbage etc., dumped onsite threatened huge health related, ground waster related issues in and around the market complex. Alternatively, the same was collected and transported to the biogas plant, minced and fed into the BIMA digester produced biogas and power. The average Total solids (TS) and volatile solids (VS/TS) in the minced mixed feed stock material was found to be 21%, and 75% respectively which was amenable for biogas production. The designed OLR, HRT, biogas and power potential was 1.20 Nm m3/day, 25 days, 2500 m3/day and 5250 kwh/day respectively. The daily average biogas and power generated during the entire study period was 1250 m3/day and 3150 kwh/day. The specific biogas and electricity yield per kg of biodegradable waste and per m3 of biogas was found to be 0.80 Nm m3/kg of VS removed and 1.85 kWh/m3 of biogas at 60% CH4 with an average calorific value of 5400 K.calories/Nm3 of biogas. The detailed operational strategy adopted to maximize biogas and power yield using wholesale vegetable complex waste are being presented.

Speaker
Biography:

Kumaran Palanisamy, a graduate mechanical engineer from Purdue University is a Senior Lecturer at Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN). He pursued his PhD studies at UNITEN, aimed at developing biodiesel fuel derived from waste cooking oil for power generation gas turbine application. He has 10 years working experience in electric power generation in a multinational electricity utility corporation in Malaysia, Tenaga Nasional Berhad. Recently, he has been appointed as Principle Researcher at Center for Renewable Energy at UNITEN and actively pursuing research on harnessing biogas energy potential from waste in particular, sewage and palm oil mill sludge.

Abstract:

Depletion of fossil fuel, environmental quality deterioration due to increasing fossil fuel utilisation and the soaring price of fossil fuel products have prompted intensified research efforts on alternative renewable sources of energy. Among the sources, biodiesel is the most pursued and promoted around the world. Several researches which have been done to evaluate the potential of biodiesel (First Generation Biodiesel – FGB) as an alternative fuel for gas turbine application found that biodiesel has few property drawbacks in terms of surface tension, viscosity and density which leads to inferior performance compared to diesel. A novel method of improving the biodiesel properties to be suitable for gas turbine application has been developed. The improved biodiesel is called Second Generation Biodiesel (SGB). This paper reports performance and emission of SGB for electrical power generation gas turbine application. The performance tests, in a 30 kW Capstone micro gas turbine up to 20% blend of second generation biodiesel (SGB) with distillate diesel, have shown improved thermal efficiency by 1% compared with first generation biodiesel (FGB) and distillate diesel. The emissions test during the micro gas turbine operation also has shown significant decrease especially in NOx emission compared to FGB and distillate diesel.

Break: Coffee Break @ Foyer 15:50-16:10
Poster Presentation @ 16:10-16:50